Research on the Balance Mechanism of Rights Conflict in the Cross-border Flow of Personal Financial Data

Authors

  • Yan Lu

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.54097/3hwd5d55

Keywords:

Personal Financial Data, Cross-Border Flow, The Balance of Rights, Data Security and Freedom

Abstract

The cross-border flow of personal financial data is inevitable due to the needs of cross-border business or overseas supervision such as anti-money laundering. The conflict between national financial security and financial efficiency results in a series of unbalanced situations under cross-border financial data. The state takes measures to regulate in order to balance different demands, promote economic development, and seek economic globalization. In an unbalanced state, the lack of systematic rights protection will lead to a lack of confidence in the degree of protection of personal financial data subjects, which may hinder the construction of global economic integration. This paper first analyzes the causes of imbalance from the perspective of value orientation and makes suggestions for institutional improvement. Secondly, from the perspective of the contradictions between the subjects of personal financial data rights and processors, as well as the contradictions between regulators, it studies the feasibility methods to check and balance and resolve the conflicts, so as to achieve the goal of clarifying the basic value and coordinating the conflict relationship. It should also focus on the development of national independent artificial intelligence, science and technology to help development cooperation, and the goal of international economic integration.

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Published

27-06-2024

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How to Cite

Lu, Y. (2024). Research on the Balance Mechanism of Rights Conflict in the Cross-border Flow of Personal Financial Data. Academic Journal of Management and Social Sciences, 7(3), 93-102. https://doi.org/10.54097/3hwd5d55